Little Thoughts on Art: Retrospectives

May 23, 2016



For some artists a retrospective exhibition is not the best idea. It’s weird, but somehow their work can be great when shown in a group show or in a solo show with just one or two pieces, but shown in its totality, the oeuvre seems to annihilate itself. Take the Carl Andre exhibition at the Hamburger Bahnhof. The importance of the oeuvre as such is clear: it is a stance that has its rights and its impact. But when all his art works are shown together, it’s hard to get excited and even harder not to get bored. M., who has a sharp mind, told me: “Die Fülle an Arbeiten tut ihm nicht gut.” (the plentitude of works does him no good.)



For some artists a retrospective exhibition is not the best idea. It’s weird, but somehow their work can be great when shown in a group show or in a solo show with just one or two pieces, but shown in its totality, the oeuvre seems to annihilate itself. Take the Carl Andre exhibition at the Hamburger Bahnhof. The importance of the oeuvre as such is clear: it is a stance that has its rights and its impact. But when all his art works are shown tog…


For some artists a retrospective exhibition is not the best idea. It’s weird, but somehow their work can be great when shown in a group show or in a solo show with just one or two pieces, but shown in its totality, the oeuvre seems to annihilate itself. Take the Carl Andre exhibition at the Hamburger Bahnhof. The importance of the oeuvre as such is clear: it is a stance that has its rights and its impact. But when all his art works are shown together, it’s hard to get excited and even harder not to get bored. M., who has a sharp mind, told me: “Die Fülle an Arbeiten tut ihm nicht gut.” (the plentitude of works does him no good.)



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