Art Observation at Sammlung Hoffmann

January 26, 2019

Looking for Jesus. Photo: Kasia Szumska

Being a critic has an impact on my personality, or maybe I always had this personality and it turned me into a critic. Take for instance Thursday night at Sammlung Hoffmann. My friend F., an art restaurer, was sitting tranquilly next to me, listening with genuine interest to the artist Katarzyna Kozyra talking about her latest documentary Looking for Jesus. I in the meantime was getting more and more agitated. I felt like whispering my comments on what was being said into my friends' ear but then decided not to disturb her peace. From the beginning, the artist was sitting on her chair with her legs folded up underneath her, which already annoyed me. Artists taking the right to sit however they want in front of an audience because they are the artist. "Sit straight!" I jelled (but then I didn't). 

Before the talk I had seen the artist's newly cut video based on her documentary about people in Israel who think they are Jesus. I found it a cynical video. Kozyra pulled an eternally bored, mocking face while she interviewed, playing with her fingers. At one point a camera focusses on the pants of a man she's interviewing and apparently he has an erection. The camera stays there for a while to show I don't know what: maybe it is to laugh with the fact that somebody who believes he's Jesus has an erection, or just to make fun of men in general, or to point out that Kozyra is so sexy she turns men on. A few minutes later we can hear the guy pee in the bathroom: apparently Kozyra didn't turn of the sound recording while he went to the loo. Such a teenager joke. In short, Kozyra makes her interviewees look like fools and I found it sad how she used them. In my opinion art is humanistic and this video wasn't. 

So I didn't really want to stay to hear the artist but F. convinced me and then trapped me on the second row. Kozyra told us that she obviously didn't prepare for her trip to Israel and she laughed how stupid she was in many of her questions. Oh my, those artists who believe they can just pull that innocence trick off because they're "artists." To go unprepared to interview people, if you're an artist or not, is basically disrespectful. Kozrya said she learned a lot from the people she interviewed. What she learned didn't really come across, not in the video and not in the talk. By the end of the talk I was totally on edge and my friend F. was looking at me in amusement. Why did I get so excited? 
Being a critic has an impact on my personality, or maybe I always had this personality and it turned me into a critic. Take for instance Thursday night at Sammlung Hoffmann. My friend F., an art restaurer, was sitting tranquilly next to me, listening with genuine interest to the artist Katarzyna Kozyra talking about her latest documentary Looking for Jesus . I in the meantime was getting more and more agitated. I felt like whispering my comments …
Looking for Jesus. Photo: Kasia Szumska

Being a critic has an impact on my personality, or maybe I always had this personality and it turned me into a critic. Take for instance Thursday night at Sammlung Hoffmann. My friend F., an art restaurer, was sitting tranquilly next to me, listening with genuine interest to the artist Katarzyna Kozyra talking about her latest documentary Looking for Jesus. I in the meantime was getting more and more agitated. I felt like whispering my comments on what was being said into my friends' ear but then decided not to disturb her peace. From the beginning, the artist was sitting on her chair with her legs folded up underneath her, which already annoyed me. Artists taking the right to sit however they want in front of an audience because they are the artist. "Sit straight!" I jelled (but then I didn't). 

Before the talk I had seen the artist's newly cut video based on her documentary about people in Israel who think they are Jesus. I found it a cynical video. Kozyra pulled an eternally bored, mocking face while she interviewed, playing with her fingers. At one point a camera focusses on the pants of a man she's interviewing and apparently he has an erection. The camera stays there for a while to show I don't know what: maybe it is to laugh with the fact that somebody who believes he's Jesus has an erection, or just to make fun of men in general, or to point out that Kozyra is so sexy she turns men on. A few minutes later we can hear the guy pee in the bathroom: apparently Kozyra didn't turn of the sound recording while he went to the loo. Such a teenager joke. In short, Kozyra makes her interviewees look like fools and I found it sad how she used them. In my opinion art is humanistic and this video wasn't. 

So I didn't really want to stay to hear the artist but F. convinced me and then trapped me on the second row. Kozyra told us that she obviously didn't prepare for her trip to Israel and she laughed how stupid she was in many of her questions. Oh my, those artists who believe they can just pull that innocence trick off because they're "artists." To go unprepared to interview people, if you're an artist or not, is basically disrespectful. Kozrya said she learned a lot from the people she interviewed. What she learned didn't really come across, not in the video and not in the talk. By the end of the talk I was totally on edge and my friend F. was looking at me in amusement. Why did I get so excited? 

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